Some of these courses will feature Hamilton or excerpts from it. Others deal with topics that are central to Hamilton. Taking any of these courses will deepen your understanding of this year's work and the issues it raises.

Fall 2017

College Writing 133: Introduction to the Craft of Dramatic Writing

John Levine |

This course in creative writing focuses on the fundamentals of reading and writing dramatic scripts. Students learn dramatic writing as an art and as a set of skills. They learn the elements involved in the creation of scripts by analyzing published scripts, as well as by drafting their own scripts and critiquing their peers' work. Particular emphasis is given to the work of generating and revising drafts, in addition to the critique and appreciation of works written for the stage.

Undergraduate Business Administration 192AC: Social Movements and Social Media

David Evan Harris |

Spring 2018

Theater, Dance and Performance Studies 25AC: Drama in American Cultures

Angela Marino |

Fall Program for Freshmen

Rhetoric R1A, section 1: Contributions

Kirsten Schwartz |

This class is aimed at improving your reading, writing and speaking skills so that your college work will be more effective and a bit easier.  With that in mind, I've chosen texts for us to read, discuss, and (in some cases) write about that will help the most to achieve that aim—and it turned out that the texts I chose were largely written by people of color, giving us insight into experiences rarely undergone by mainstream Americans.  Each one of them makes an important "Contribution" to our understanding of these experiences.  "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is not only brilliant, but a necessary part of everyone's civic education; Just Mercy, the On The Same Page book from last year, was so very successful with my students that I had to teach it again, and Stevenson eloquently warns us of the consequences of a broken justice system as well as giving us hope that we can improve it.  Hamilton IS the On The Same Page text for this year—a brilliant, juicy choice—and much of the course has been given over to it.  Students will read the book that inspired Miranda, Chernow's celebrated biography of the Founding Father, as well as reading the libretto with commentary, so that we get the full experience of the sweeping piece of art that is the cast recording.  Lastly, the utopian novel Kin of Ata is aimed to give us some relief and some hope at the end, so we end up with an easier and more uplifting last few weeks as things rush to the usual frantic semester end.  There will be reading, writing exercises, well-supported public speaking, a little research (fun), as well as essays done in several drafts.  Rapping: optional, but attempts are welcome.

Rhetoric R1B, section 2: Contributions

Kirsten Schwartz |

This class is aimed at improving your reading, writing and speaking skills so that your college work will be more effective and a bit easier.  With that in mind, I've chosen texts for us to read, discuss, and (in some cases) write about that will help the most to achieve that aim—and it turned out that the texts I chose were largely written by people of color, giving us insight into experiences rarely undergone by mainstream Americans.  Each one of them makes an important "Contribution" to our understanding of these experiences.  "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is not only brilliant, but a necessary part of everyone's civic education; Just Mercy, the On The Same Page book from last year, was so very successful with my students that I had to teach it again, and Stevenson eloquently warns us of the consequences of a broken justice system as well as giving us hope that we can improve it.  Hamilton IS the On The Same Page text for this year—a brilliant, juicy choice—and much of the course has been given over to it.  Students will read the book that inspired Miranda, Chernow's celebrated biography of the Founding Father, as well as reading the libretto with commentary, so that we get the full experience of the sweeping piece of art that is the cast recording.  Lastly, the utopian novel Kin of Ata is aimed to give us some relief and some hope at the end, so we end up with an easier and more uplifting last few weeks as things rush to the usual frantic semester end.  There will be reading, writing exercises, well-supported public speaking, some research to produce an annotated bibliography, as well as academic essays done in several drafts.  Rapping: optional, but attempts are welcome.